Resource title

Demographic, residential, and socioeconomic effects on the distribution of 19th century African-American stature

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image for OpenScout resource :: Demographic, residential, and socioeconomic effects on the distribution of 19th century African-American stature

Resource description

The use of height data to measure living standards is now a well-established method in the economic literature, and heights are related with vitamin D. Although African-Americans and whites have the genetic ability to reach similar terminal statures, 19th century blacks were consistently shorter than whites. Greater insolation (vitamin D production), is documented here to be associated with taller black statures. Consistent with the insolation-hypothesis, mulattos were taller than darker pigmented blacks, and most of the mulatto-black stature differential was attributable to age and insolation. Black farmers were taller than workers in other occupations, and black statures increased during the antebellum period and decreased with slavery's elimination, which is observed across the stature distribution.

Resource author

Scott Alan Carson

Resource publisher

Resource publish date

Resource language

eng

Resource content type

text/html

Resource resource URL

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/26524

Resource license

Adapt according to the presented license agreement and reference the original author.